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Moffat’s Women - Elizabeth I

The depiction of Elizabeth I is interesting, because it plays on the audience’s expectation. On the surface, she begins the episode as a caricature, a natural prequel to her portrayal in The Shakespeare Code and jokes preceding The Day of the Doctor. But underneath her more jaring characteristics, she truly shines - not only is she perceptive and witty, she is brilliant strategist and leader. To underestimate her is a grave mistake.

The line "I may have the body of a weak and feeble woman" is lifted nearly word for word from a speech given by the historical figure. In it, she continues: “…but I have the heart and stomach of a king, and a king of England too.” [xTaking up arms and slaying the Zygon, demonstrating quick thinking when she decides to  impersonate her own duplicate, providing the Doctor with a potential escape and ultimately figuring out the Zygons’ entire backstory and plan - Elizabeth is certainly shown to fit this description.

(via clarabosswald)

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"Man can go anywhere. Man picks up hot chicks. Man travels universe. Man fights aliens. Man can change."

Matt Smith (x)

This is Moffat’s legacy.  Man does. Man gets Hot Chick. Man fights.  Man wins.

This quote should disappoint every single viewer who’s followed the show.  Whether you just started marathoning the show or are introducing the show to your children—that quote is not the show.  That quote is Moffat and his narrow vision:  Man does. Man gets Hot Chick. Man fights. Man wins. Man. Man. Man. 

(via its-growth-decay-transformation)

how the fuck does at least one person, without fail, manage to claim steven moffat is responsible each time matt smith makes a sexist comment.

like do you not think matt smith has control over his own thoughts and mouth or what.

(via rightnowbb)

(via rightnowbb)

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august-songs said: You do know about Moffat (not as a screenwriter) right? his fucked up comments? He's a shitty guy

"Not as a screenwriter"—that’s not what I’m about tbh. I’m interested in talking about his writing, not so much his merits as a human.

I’ve not met him. You’ve not met him. Most people who haven’t bothered to read these “masterlist” things put together for that specific purpose, don’t listen to his remarks. As a human being (as opposed to as a writer) he’s not that influential. And as such, I can’t say I think it’s an important issue whether he’s technically a good person or not.

Discuss why his remarks were problematic by all means; it’d be off-topic for this blog but I’ve no interest in objecting to people discussing it anywhere else. But I’ve also got no interest in collecting problematic mistakes from people’s past, passing judgement and hating them as a result due to some delusion of superiority. I’m comfortable to admit I have made mistakes and said problematic things in my past as have many people, but I’m interested in learning from those mistakes and educating others—not in assessing the moral goodness of other people and dropping them into categories “shitty and problematic” or “flawless and awesome”. I don’t think I’m in a position to do that. I don’t think anyone’s really in a position to do that.

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amypuddles:

amy pond’s childhood is shaped by the doctor; her adolescence is negatively affected by him and her parents, aunt and friends - or lack thereof - trivialise her experiences until she genuinely believes she’s mad. the doctor was an escape from her insensitive aunt and a life of abandonment and loneliness and he disappeared, leaving her sitting alone in a garden, waiting for an escape route that took fourteen years to finally materialise

because of this, she’s understandably afraid of commitment, and runs away regardless of her responsibilities. she’s reckless and insecure and terrified of settling down because what if it’s the wrong decision? what if she regrets it? what if rory leaves her, like everybody else has?

clara oswald is a woman confident and assured in her current role; looking after people. willing to place the needs of others above her own, she puts her dreams and desires aside to comfort a family suffering a tragedy she can relate to. despite the doctor’s offer - the ability to effectively abandon everyone and everything to fulfil her dreams of adventure - she refuses and creates a travelling schedule ensuring her current commitments on earth aren’t ignored or forgotten

these characters are not remotely the same

(via oimatchstickman)

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millyblank said: That Amy post hit me really hard. I really relate to Amy and to see people dismiss her or expect her to "be normal" otherwise she's flat and uninteresting is hurtful. Thanks for posting it.

Tags: millyblank
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"I did joke around with Steven Moffat in our first meeting. Immediately there was press saying, ‘Woman woman woman,’ and so I said, ‘It’s clear if I read the internet that you hired me because I’m a woman.’ And he said, ‘Oh, you’re a woman? Maybe I just looked at your resume and your reel and your credentials and hired you because of that.’ We both agree that that’s what we hope I was hired on. I should stop there and say I’m incredibly fortunate to have the experience in effects that a lot of women don’t get. So I was able to put together a reel of special effects and action that most women don’t have."

— Rachel Talalay has told feminist website BitchMedia that there was no positive discrimination when it came to her appointment on series eight of Doctor Who. [Source] (via fafana20)

(via peterichardferris)

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amypuddles:

amy pond is important

she’s the girl belittled, patronized, and criticized by people in authority; by her guardian, her friends. the girl who’s told her beliefs, feelings and experiences are wrong and invalid; that she’s mad, insane; that she needs treatment and therapy; that she needs to grow up, to tell herself she’s a liar, or crazy, or just a dreamer unable to distinguish truth from reality

she’s an isolated child; the scottish girl in the english village - untrusting and sceptical even of herself and her own beliefs, because how can she trust herself and what she sees and believes when nobody else does? she’s the girl who starts to think she’s mad because that’s all anybody ever says about her

she’s the girl who’s beliefs are eventually validated; the girl who’s faith and experiences are verified; the girl who’s told she’s right; that all the bullies and therapists and people sworn to supposedly support and protect her are wrong; she sees what people refuse to see and believes what people refuse to believe despite what everybody else says, even at the cost of lifetime isolation and mockery. she becomes the scottish girl in the english village who doesn’t give a damn and brings her imaginary friend back into existence for all the world and everyone who ever doubted her to see

(via queenshulamit)

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So I saw that Confessions post going round again, the one that claims that Amy has no character traits that don’t involve her job and her relationship to the three major people in her life (the Doctor, Rory, and River).  And it occurred to me, somewhat belatedly—that argument is actually pretty ablist.

I think it’s fairly clear that Amy is not what you’d call neurotypical.  Not only does she have multiple sets of memories, but she was essentially orphaned in two timelines, which probably left her with some sort of attachment disorder.  (She certainly has a few of the symptoms, such as trouble processing her own emotions.)  And on top of <i>that,</i> she was misdiagnosed throughout much of her childhood—possibly even with schizophrenia, although it’s never made clear.  Amy’s ability to form connections has been impaired by her uniqueness, by her trauma, by the stigma of mental illness, and by the fact that virtually everyone around her misinterprets what’s going on.

Claiming that she is fake and one-dimensional because she is isolated, because she has failed to form “normal” connections—that’s not okay.  Because there are people reading these comments who have had trouble forming bonds with others, who may worry quite a bit about whether their relationships are “normal” or “count”—and you just effectively told those people not only that their connections don’t count, but that they aren’t even real.  That people who don’t come with a set of childhood friends are fake and unbelievable and should never have been written.

I hope it’s obvious why that message is not cool.

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amypuddles:

amy pond is important

she’s the girl belittled, patronized, and criticized by people in authority; by her guardian, her friends. the girl who’s told her beliefs, feelings and experiences are wrong and invalid; that she’s mad, insane; that she needs treatment and therapy; that she needs to grow up, to tell herself she’s a liar, or crazy, or just a dreamer unable to distinguish truth from reality

she’s an isolated child; the scottish girl in the english village - untrusting and sceptical even of herself and her own beliefs, because how can she trust herself and what she sees and believes when nobody else does? she’s the girl who starts to think she’s mad because that’s all anybody ever says about her

she’s the girl who’s beliefs are eventually validated; the girl who’s faith and experiences are verified; the girl who’s told she’s right; that all the bullies and therapists and people sworn to supposedly support and protect her are wrong; she sees what people refuse to see and believes what people refuse to believe despite what everybody else says, even at the cost of lifetime isolation and mockery. she becomes the scottish girl in the english village who doesn’t give a damn and brings her imaginary friend back into existence for all the world and everyone who ever doubted her to see

(via rightnowbb)